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Career Readiness Credential for Job Seekers

 

 

The Career Readiness Credential (CRC) enables you to show prospective employers that you possess the basic foundational skills they are looking for and have the trainability for success in an organization. Even if you have a high school diploma (or GED) or a post-secondary degree, the CRC further verifies that you can handle the kinds of tasks – finding information, reading instructions and directions, even working with figures – that are common in today's workplace.

 

How does the Career Readiness Credential work?
 

Building on a Proven Program
The CRC is based on established WorkKeys® assessments, a nationally recognized system. To earn a CRC, individuals undergo testing related to reading, applied math, and locating information through the WorkKeys skills assessment system.  The credential confirms a person’s competence in these skill areas and provides documentation to an employer of these workplace competencies.
 

A Chance to Advance
Individuals can earn three levels of Career Readiness Credentials based on their test performance in Applied Mathematics, Reading for Information, and Locating Information.
 

BRONZE

SILVER

GOLD

PLATINUM

Bronze level signifies that a recipient possesses skills for approximately 30% of the jobs profiled by WorkKeys in these three specific skill areas.

Silver signifies that a recipient possesses skills for approximately 65% of jobs profiled by WorkKeys in these areas.

In addition to the skills required for a Bronze Certificate, individuals can also perform the following tasks:

Gold signifies that a recipient possesses skills for 85% of jobs profiled by WorkKeys in the three areas.

In addition to the skills required for a Silver Certificate, individuals can also perform the following tasks:

Platinum signifies that a recipient possesses skills for 99% of jobs profiled by WorkKeys in the three areas.

In addition to the skills required for a Gold Certificate, individuals can also perform the following tasks:

Applied Mathematics

Applied Mathematics

Applied Mathematics

Applied Mathematics

  • Solve problems that require a single type of mathematics operation (addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division) using whole numbers
  • Add or subtract negative numbers
  • Change numbers from one form to another using whole numbers, fractions, decimals, or percentages
  • Convert simple money and time units (e.g., hours to minutes)
  • Solve problems that require one or two operations
  • Multiply negative numbers
  • Calculate averages, simple ratios, simple proportions, or rates using whole numbers and decimals
  • Add commonly known fractions, decimals, or percentages (e.g., 1/2, .75, 25%)
  • Add up to three fractions that share a common denominator
  • Multiply a mixed number by a whole number or decimal
  • Put the information in the right order before performing calculations
  • Decide what information, calculations, or unit conversions to use to solve the problem
  • Look up a formula and perform single-step conversions within or between systems of measurement
  • Calculate using mixed units (e.g., 3.5 hours and 4 hours 30 minutes)
  • Divide negative numbers
  • Find the best deal using one- and two-step calculations and then comparing results
  • Calculate perimeters and areas of basic shapes (rectangles and circles)
  • Calculate percent discounts or markups
  • Use fractions, negative numbers, ratios, percentages, or mixed numbers
  • Rearrange a formula before solving a problem
  • Use two formulas to change from one unit to another within the same system of
  • measurement
  • Use two formulas to change from one unit
  • in one system of measurement to a unit in
  • another system of measurement
  • Find mistakes in questions that belong at Levels 3, 4, and 5
  • Find the best deal and use the result for another calculation
  • Find areas of basic shapes when it may be necessary to rearrange the formula, convert
  • units of measurement in the calculations, or use the result in further calculations
  • Find the volume of rectangular solids
  • Calculate multiple rates

Locating Information

Locating Information

Locating Information

Locating Information

  • Find one or two pieces of information in a graphic
  • Fill in one or two pieces of information that are missing from a graphic
  • Find several pieces of information in one or two graphics
  • Understand how graphics are related to each other
  • Summarize information from one or two straightforward graphics
  • Identify trends shown in one or two straightforward graphics
  • Compare information and trends shown in one or two straightforward graphics
  • Sort through distracting information
  • Summarize information from one or more detailed graphics
  • Identify trends shown in one or more detailed or complicated graphics
  • Compare information and trends from one or more complicated graphics
  • Draw conclusions based on one complicated graphic or several related graphics
  • Apply information from one or more complicated graphics to specific situations
  • Use the information to make decisions

Reading Information

Reading Information

Reading Information

Reading Information

  • Identify main ideas and clearly stated details
  • Choose the correct meaning of a word that is clearly defined in the reading
  • Choose the correct meaning of common, everyday workplace words
  • Choose when to perform each step in a short series of steps
  • Apply instructions to a situation that is the same as the one in the reading materials
  • Identify important details that may not be clearly stated
  • Use the reading material to figure out the meaning of words that are not defined
  • Apply instructions with several steps to a situation that is the same as the situation in the reading materials
  • Choose what to do when changing conditions call for a different action (follow directions that include "if-then" statements)
  • Determine the correct meaning of a word based on how the word is used
  • Identify the correct meaning of an acronym that is defined in the document
  • Identify the paraphrased definition of a technical term or jargon that is defined in the document
  • Apply technical terms and jargon and relate them to stated situations
  • Apply straightforward instructions to a new situation that is similar to the one described in the material
  • Apply complex instructions that include conditionals to situations described in the materials
  • Identify implied details
  • Use technical terms and jargon in new situations
  • Figure out the less common meaning of a word based on the context
  • Apply complicated instructions to new situations
  • Figure out the principles behind policies, rules, and procedures
  • Apply general principles from the materials to similar and new situations
  • Explain the rationale behind a procedure, policy, or communication
     

WorkKeys Occupational Opportunities

RochesterWorks! offers skills development though an on-line learning system to individuals who wish to improve their scores in one or all three of the areas assessed by the CRC.  KeyTrain is a comprehensive on-line system designed to increase WorkKeys scores and close gaps that may exist between employer requirements and individual skill levels.  This service can be accessed from any computer with Internet connectivity and is available at no cost to qualifying RochesterWorks! members.

 

How to Earn a Career Readiness Credential?

RochesterWorks! members can obtain a Career Readiness Credential by taking the three WorkKeys assessments.  Contact a RochesterWorks! Career Center Representative for more information. 

See Brochure

 

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

What is a Career Readiness Credential (CRC)?
A Career Credential that certifies that job seekers have the core employability skills required across  multiple industries and occupations.  The three assessments that make up the CRC are Applied Mathematics, Reading for Information, and Locating Information.  

Why is a CRC Needed?
There is great concern about the gap that exists between the skills required in today's workplace and those exhibited by potential and incumbent employees. Businesses have trouble finding and hiring people who have basic employability skills and who are therefore trainable for specific jobs. The Career Readiness Credential is a portable skills credential, assuring employers that a job applicant actually has the basic skills required to be successful.

Why a tiered approach to Career Readiness credentialing?
A tiered model for a portable credential allows for a progression of skills development and connects different skill levels to the success in occupational fields consistent with that level.  An individual who does not meet the minimum scores to attain a CRC or who wants to increase their scores, can do so through an on-line learning system, KeyTrain.   

Why use the WorkKeys® Assessments to certify employability skills?
Over the last ten years, WorkKeys has become a widely accepted common language for skills definition among employers, educators/trainers, and potential/incumbent employees. The power of the WorkKeys system lies in its: 1) objectivity, 2) simplicity, 3) compliance with federal law (ADA, EEOC), and 4) legal defensibility.

Of the tens of thousands of jobs that have been profiled nationally using WorkKeys, about 85% of them use the three WorkKeys assessments that make up the CRC:  Reading for Information, Applied Mathematics, and Locating Information. Click here for more information on the National CRC.

 

Questions?

For more information contact Kimberly Breedlove at (585) 263-4591.

 

   

 

Revised 3/30/16

 
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